Headhunter

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DEFINITION of 'Headhunter'

A corporation or individual that provides employment recruiting services. A headhunter is hired by firms to find talent, and to locate individuals who meet specific job requirements, such as an executive with 15 years experience in a certain field. The term headhunter may also be referred to as an executive recruiter. Headhunters may have a pool of candidates for specific positions, or may act aggressively to find talent by looking at competitors' employees.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Headhunter'

A headhunter is retained to fill positions, often for jobs that require high skills levels, or offer high pay. Headhunters working on behalf of a firm often scour international organizations for top talent. In comparison to job fairs, headhunters seek individuals based on their skill level, not potential employees based on looser skill classes. In addition, some individuals may contact a headhunter to provide a resume or curriculum vitae (CV), or to apply for a position for which the headhunter is seeking talent.


Also known as an Executive Searcher

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