Headhunter

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Headhunter'

A corporation or individual that provides employment recruiting services. A headhunter is hired by firms to find talent, and to locate individuals who meet specific job requirements, such as an executive with 15 years experience in a certain field. The term headhunter may also be referred to as an executive recruiter. Headhunters may have a pool of candidates for specific positions, or may act aggressively to find talent by looking at competitors' employees.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Headhunter'

A headhunter is retained to fill positions, often for jobs that require high skills levels, or offer high pay. Headhunters working on behalf of a firm often scour international organizations for top talent. In comparison to job fairs, headhunters seek individuals based on their skill level, not potential employees based on looser skill classes. In addition, some individuals may contact a headhunter to provide a resume or curriculum vitae (CV), or to apply for a position for which the headhunter is seeking talent.


Also known as an Executive Searcher

RELATED TERMS
  1. Skilled Labor

    A segment of the work force with a high skill level that creates ...
  2. Unemployment

    Unemployment occurs when a person who is actively searching for ...
  3. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include ...
  4. Human Capital

    A measure of the economic value of an employee's skill set. This ...
  5. Bureau Of Labor Statistics - BLS

    A government agency that produces economic data that reflects ...
  6. Civil Rights Act of 1964

    Landmark federal legislation that prohibits discrimination on ...
Related Articles
  1. Professionals

    Top Job Search Mistakes For Finance Grads

    Looking to land your dream job? Skip the entry-level position by avoiding these common errors.
  2. Professionals

    Top 4 Most Competitive Financial Careers

    If your goals include a big paycheck and working for a Wall Street firm, then you need to learn how to meet employers' expectations.
  3. Professionals

    7 Courses Finance Students Should Take

    These college classes will help you prepare for the working world. Learn how to stand out from your peers.
  4. Mergers are not the same as acquisitions.
    Investing

    What's a Merger?

    Mergers are not the same as acquisitions. In an acquisition, one company buys and subsumes another company, leaving only the buyer in place. In most mergers, both companies merge to form an entirely ...
  5. As the number of new employees increases, the marginal product of an additional employee will at some point be less.
    Investing

    More is Less: Diminishing Marginal Returns

    In formal economic terms, the law of diminishing marginal returns states that as the number of new employees increases, the marginal product of an additional employee will at some point be less ...
  6. Typically, SPEs are subsidiaries of a larger corporation.
    Investing

    How Special Purpose Entities Help Fight Risk

    A special purpose entity, sometimes called a special purpose vehicle, is a legal entity created for one very limited, particular task. Typically, SPEs are subsidiaries of a larger corporation.
  7. SWOT stands for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats.
    Professionals

    What is a SWOT Analysis?

    SWOT stands for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats. SWOT analysis is a management tool used to identify strategies for success. It may be used to guide individual thinking, group ...
  8. Accounting is the recording of financial transactions of a business or organization.
    Professionals

    What is Accounting?

    Accounting is the recording of financial transactions of a business or organization. It also includes the process of summarizing, analyzing and reporting these transactions in financial statements.
  9. What's a Multinational Corporation?
    Investing

    What's a Multinational Corporation?

    A multinational corporation is just that – a corporation that operates in multiple nations, with a home office that coordinates global management. Being a multinational corporation is a complicated ...
  10. How does Outsourcing Work?
    Economics

    How does Outsourcing Work?

    Outsourcing is the business practice of hiring people outside a company to perform services that traditionally were performed within the company, by the business’s own employees. Companies typically ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Santa Claus Rally

    A surge in the price of stocks that often occurs in the week between Christmas and New Year's Day. There are numerous explanations ...
  2. Commodity

    1. A basic good used in commerce that is interchangeable with other commodities of the same type. Commodities are most often ...
  3. Deferred Revenue

    Advance payments or unearned revenue, recorded on the recipient's balance sheet as a liability, until the services have been ...
  4. Multinational Corporation - MNC

    A corporation that has its facilities and other assets in at least one country other than its home country. Such companies ...
  5. SWOT Analysis

    A tool that identifies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of an organization. Specifically, SWOT is a basic, ...
  6. Simple Interest

    A quick method of calculating the interest charge on a loan. Simple interest is determined by multiplying the interest rate ...
Trading Center