Heavy

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DEFINITION of 'Heavy'

A market that is demonstrating difficulty in advancing and is displaying a tendency to decline. A heavy market may be a manifestation of investor uncertainty about near-term direction, and a sign that the market is topping out. It may also be characterized by a shortage of buyers (many of whom may prefer to stay on the sidelines until the uncertainty abates) and an abundance of sellers. Such a market is sometimes also referred to as a top-heavy market.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Heavy'

A heavy market could find itself vulnerable to toppling over if economic conditions and/or uncertainty worsen, as this would exacerbate the imbalance between buyers and sellers of stocks or futures. As such, a heavy market could be interpreted as a signal of, or precursor to, a potential steep decline in the near to medium-term.

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