DEFINITION of 'HedgeStreet'

An internet-based, government-regulated market that allows traders to perform hedging activities or speculate on specific economic events. Binaries and futures contracts are provided on different markets including commodities, currencies, employment, inflation and other economic indicators.


HedgeStreet was developed to give the average investor the ability to profit from the outcomes of certain economic events. HedgeStreet benefits small investors by having small contract sizes at low prices. HedgeStreet is regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

  1. Hedge

    Making an investment to reduce the risk of adverse price movements ...
  2. Derivative

    A security with a price that is dependent upon or derived from ...
  3. Indicator

    Indicators are statistics used to measure current conditions ...
  4. Commodity

    1. A basic good used in commerce that is interchangeable with ...
  5. Futures

    A financial contract obligating the buyer to purchase an asset ...
  6. Commodity Futures Trading Commission ...

    An independent U.S. federal agency established by the Commodity ...
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  1. What is the difference between hedging and speculation?

    Hedging involves taking an offsetting position in a derivative in order to balance any gains and losses to the underlying ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do hedge funds invest in commodities?

    There are several hedge funds that invest in commodities. Many hedge funds have broad macroeconomic strategies and invest ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Can mutual funds invest in options and futures?

    Mutual funds invest in not only stocks and fixed-income securities but also options and futures. There exists a separate ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Can mutual funds invest in commodities?

    Mutual funds can invest in commodities. In fact, mutual funds may provide a better way for investors to gain exposure to ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do futures contracts roll over?

    Traders roll over futures contracts to switch from the front month contract that is close to expiration to another contract ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Is there a difference between financial spread betting and arbitrage?

    Financial spread betting is a type of speculation that involves a highly leveraged derivative product, whereas arbitrage ... Read Full Answer >>

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