Held-to-Maturity Securities

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DEFINITION of 'Held-to-Maturity Securities'

Debt securities that a firm has the ability and intent to hold until maturity.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Held-to-Maturity Securities'

These are reported at amortized cost, therefore, they are not affected by swings in the financial markets.

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