Heterodox Economics

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DEFINITION of 'Heterodox Economics'

The analysis and study of economic principles considered outside of mainstream or orthodox schools of economic thought. Schools of heterodox economics include socialism, Marxism, post-Keynesian and Austrian, and often combine the macroeconomic outlook found in Keynesian economics with approaches critical of neoclassical economics.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Heterodox Economics'

Heterodox economics provides an alternative approach to mainstream economics that may help give explanation to economic phenomenon that don't received widespread credence. In addition, heterodox economics seeks to embed social and historical factors into analysis, as well as evaluate the way in which the behavior of both individuals and societies alters the development of market equilibriums.

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