High-Speed Data Feed

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DEFINITION of 'High-Speed Data Feed'

A data stream that transmits information at a faster pace than normal data feeds. A high-speed data feed is one in which data, such as quotes and yields, are transmitted in real time and without delays. In addition, high-speed data feeds will communicate information in a non-netted format, as opposed to previous "fast" feeds, which presented data in a pulsed format.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'High-Speed Data Feed'

High-speed data feeds will often filter information in real time for a variety of information types from a multitude of sources. Equity prices, derivative values, fixed-income valuations and yield information is made available for all levels of quotes (I, II and III). Access to such feeds will give traders the distinct advantage of quicker, more reliable information to use for the basis of their trades. Bloomberg's B-PIPE data feed is an example of a high-speed feed.

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