High Street Bank

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DEFINITION of 'High Street Bank'

A term originating in the U.K. to refer to large retail banks which have many branch locations. The term "high street" is meant to indicate that these banks are major, widespread institutions, such as those that would be found in the main commercial sector of a town or city. High street is roughly synonymous to the American term "Main Street."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'High Street Bank'

Major high street banks in the U.K. include Barclays PLC, Royal Bank of Scotland Group PLC (RBS), Llyods TSB Bank PLC, and HSBC Bank PLC. These large High Street banks typically offer a diverse selection of banking services such as online banking, mortgages and savings.

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