Higher Education Act of 1965 – HEA

DEFINITION of 'Higher Education Act of 1965 – HEA'

A law designed to strengthen the educational resources of the colleges and universities of the United States and to provide financial assistance to post-secondary students. The HEA, as it is known, increased federal money given to post-secondary institutions, developed scholarship programs, provided low-interest loans to students, and founded a National Teachers Corps. Part of President Lyndon B. Johnson's Great Society domestic agenda, the Act was signed into law on November 8, 1965.

BREAKING DOWN 'Higher Education Act of 1965 – HEA'

The Higher Education Act of 1965 included six titles:


Title I – Provides funding for extension and continuing education programs.
Title II – Allocates money to enhance library collections.
Title III – Provisions for strengthening developing institutions.
Title IV – Provides student assistance through scholarships, low-interest loans, and work-study programs.
Title V – Provisions for improving the quality of teaching.
Title VI – Provisions for improving undergraduate instruction.


The Higher Education Act of 1965 has undergone multiple reauthorizations and amendments, including the addition of new title initiatives.

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