Heath-Jarrow-Morton Model - HJM Model

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DEFINITION of 'Heath-Jarrow-Morton Model - HJM Model'

A model that applies forward rates to an existing term structure of interest rates to determine appropriate prices for securities that are sensitive to changes in interest rates.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Heath-Jarrow-Morton Model - HJM Model'

The HJM model is very theoretical and is used at the most advanced levels of financial analysis. It is used mainly by arbitrageurs seeking arbitrage opportunities.
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