Holdovers

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DEFINITION of 'Holdovers'

Checks that are in transit that are delayed during the collection process until the next cycle. In most cases, this is the following business day. Holdover checks are then bundled into cash letters and presented to either a clearinghouse or the paying bank for deposit.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Holdovers'

Holdovers are typically found in large clearinghouse banks. This type of hold is different from a hold that a bank puts on out of state or third party checks. In this case, the check is usually held over simply because it was received too late in the day for same-day processing.

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