Home Debtor


DEFINITION of 'Home Debtor'

An individual who holds a large mortgage with little or no equity in the home. The term "home debtor" is often used to describe those who will likely never be able to pay off their mortgage because of the costs associated with home ownership, such as property taxes, mortgage payments, insurance and necessary repairs.


Unfortunately, millions of individuals fall into the category of home debtor, and with the high costs of owning a home, this term is often more appropriate than the commonly used word "homeowner." It is important for any person who is looking to buy a house to understand the underlying costs of the purchase and to ensure that they can afford to make the required payments.

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  3. Home Equity

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  4. Debtor

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  5. 100% Mortgage

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