Horizontal Market

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DEFINITION of 'Horizontal Market'

A market diversified so that the products created are able to meet the needs of more than one industry. A horizontal market is one in which the output good or service is widely used and in wide demand, thus the producers bear little risk in demand for their output, however will typically face a great amount of competition within the industry.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Horizontal Market'

The profitability for companies producing goods in a horizontal market is determined more by internal, rather than external, factors, as their products are commonly used. An example of a horizontal market is the demand for pens across any and all industries. Pens are used in basically all industries, therefore success or failure for pen producers is determined by internal decisions and factors, rather than macro events.

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