Horizontal Market

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Horizontal Market'

A market diversified so that the products created are able to meet the needs of more than one industry. A horizontal market is one in which the output good or service is widely used and in wide demand, thus the producers bear little risk in demand for their output, however will typically face a great amount of competition within the industry.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Horizontal Market'

The profitability for companies producing goods in a horizontal market is determined more by internal, rather than external, factors, as their products are commonly used. An example of a horizontal market is the demand for pens across any and all industries. Pens are used in basically all industries, therefore success or failure for pen producers is determined by internal decisions and factors, rather than macro events.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Downstream

    The oil and gas operations that take place after the production ...
  2. Vertical Market

    A group of companies that serve each other's specialized needs ...
  3. Hot Money

    1. Money that flows regularly between financial markets as investors ...
  4. Upstream

    Operations stages in the oil and gas industry that involve exploration ...
  5. Horizontal Merger

    A merger occurring between companies in the same industry. Horizontal ...
  6. Factor Market

    A marketplace for the services of a factor of production.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the relationship between research and development and innovation?

    Although it's possible to achieve innovation without research and development and it's possible to conduct research and development ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How is minimum transfer price calculated?

    A company that transfers goods between multiple divisions needs to establish a transfer price so that each division can track ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does neoclassical economics relate to neoliberalism?

    While it may be likely that many neoliberal thinkers endorse the use of (or even emphasize) neoclassical economics, the two ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are common concepts and techniques of managerial accounting?

    The common concepts and techniques of managerial accounting are all the concepts and techniques that surround planning and ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is abatement cost accounted for on financial statements?

    Abatement costs are accounted for on a company's financial statements through increases in either cost of goods sold or operational ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. According to the neoclassical growth theory, what factors influence the growth of ...

    The neoclassical growth theory builds five major variables into its time-sensitive production formula. The first is total ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    Hidden Costs Of Product Rebates

    These cash incentives lure in consumers, who are often unable to collect on the deal.
  2. Investing Basics

    The Advantages Of Investing In Aggressive Companies

    Often the most attractive companies are also a little fierce - learn how to spot healthy corporate aggression.
  3. Entrepreneurship

    Getting To Know Business Models

    Learning how to assess business models helps investors identify companies that are the best investments.
  4. Entrepreneurship

    10 Breakout Ideas For Small Businesses

    If your business has hit a wall, we've got the answer to break through and increase sales and earnings.
  5. Professionals

    Lead The Charge With Product Development

    If you like to keep your finger on the pulse of the market, this could be the career for you.
  6. Economics

    Calculating Income Elasticity of Demand

    Income elasticity of demand is a measure of how consumer demand changes when income changes.
  7. Economics

    Understanding Implicit Costs

    An implicit cost is any cost associated with not taking a certain action.
  8. Economics

    Understanding Diseconomies of Scale

    Diseconomies of scale is the point where a business no longer experiences decreasing costs per unit of output.
  9. Economics

    What Does Capital Intensive Mean?

    Capital intensive refers to a business or industry that requires a substantial amount of money or financial resources to engage in its specific business.
  10. Economics

    What is an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM)?

    An OEM is a company whose products are used as components in another company's product.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  2. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  3. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  4. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  5. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  6. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!