Hostile Takeover

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DEFINITION of 'Hostile Takeover'

The acquisition of one company (called the target company) by another (called the acquirer) that is accomplished not by coming to an agreement with the target company's management, but by going directly to the company's shareholders or fighting to replace management in order to get the acquisition approved. A hostile takeover can be accomplished through either a tender offer or a proxy fight.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Hostile Takeover'

The key characteristic of a hostile takeover is that the target company's management does not want the deal to go through. Sometimes a company's management will defend against unwanted hostile takeovers by using several controversial strategies including the poison pill, crown-jewel defense, golden parachute, pac-man defense, and others.

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  2. How is a tender offer used by an individual, group or company seeking to purchase ...

    A tender offer is made directly to shareholders in a publicly traded company to gain enough shares to force a sale of the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are some examples of successfully executed leveraged buyouts?

    In finance, a buyout refers to the purchase of a company's voting stock in which the acquiring party gains control of the ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What happens to the shares of a company that has been the object of a hostile takeover?

    The shares of a company that is the object of a hostile takeover rise. When a group of investors believe management is not ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between a hostile takeover and a friendly takeover?

    A hostile takeover occurs when one corporation, the acquiring corporation, attempts to take over another corporation, the ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do modern corporations deal with agency problems?

    Agency problems – also known as principal-agent problems or asymmetric information-driven conflicts of interest – are inherent ... Read Full Answer >>
  7. How do companies use the Pac-Man defense?

    To employ the Pac-Man defense, a company will scare off another company that had tried to acquire it by purchasing large ... Read Full Answer >>
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