Hot Money

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DEFINITION of 'Hot Money'

1. Money that flows regularly between financial markets as investors attempt to ensure they get the highest short-term interest rates possible. Hot money will flow from low interest rate yielding countries into higher interest rates countries by investors looking to make the highest return. These financial transfers could affect the exchange rate if the sum is high enough and can therefore impact the balance of payments.

2. Stolen money that is marked so as as to be traceable.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Hot Money'

1. Banks usually attract "hot money" by offering relatively short-term certificates of deposit that have above-average interest rates. As soon as the institution reduces interest rates or another institution offers higher rates, investors with "hot money" withdraw their funds and move them to another institution with higher rates.


2. Hot money might have been involved in a robbery and tracked through dye marks on each bill or through recorded serial numbers.





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