House Swap

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DEFINITION of 'House Swap'

A practice in which the owners of a home allow the use of that property in exchange for the use of another party's home. A house swap does not involve the sale of a home; rather, it allows a homeowner to "borrow" someone else's home. It can be some on a temporary or semi-permanent basis. House swaps typically involve an exchange in property use for the purpose of vacation. They are also options for homeowners who need to relocate due to a change in job, but are unable to sell their home due to a depressed housing market.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'House Swap'

Homeowners who do not want to give up a piece of property but wish to stay in another area may enter into a house swap agreement. For example, the owner of a condo in Miami may enter into a house swap agreement with the owner of a home in Denver. The Miami homeowner may like to ski in the winter, while the Denver homeowner may like to visit the beach in the winter.




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