House Excess

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DEFINITION of 'House Excess'

A term used by brokerage houses to describe the amount you are in excess of the minimum margin requirements, based upon the last days closing prices of your portfolio.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'House Excess'

In other words, this is the amount you have left over to purchase more stock or use as a safety cushion should your portfolio decline in value.

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