Hubris

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DEFINITION of 'Hubris'

The characteristic of excessive confidence or arrogance, which leads a person to believe that he or she may do no wrong. The overwhelming pride caused by hubris is often considered a flaw in character. While these hubris feelings are often justified, they often cause irrational and harmful behavior.


Chief executive officers and very successful businessmen who are overcome with hubris tend to be difficult to work with in team settings.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Hubris'

Hubris may be developed after a person encounters a period of success. Corporate executives and traders overcome by hubris may become a liability for their firms. A manager might start making business decisions without fully thinking through the consequences, or a trader may begin taking on excessive risk. In many cases, people overcome by hubris will bring about their own downfall.

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