HUD-1 Form

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DEFINITION of 'HUD-1 Form'

A form used by a settlement or closing agent itemizing all charges imposed on a borrower and seller in a real estate transaction. This form gives a picture of the closing transaction, and provides each party with a complete list of incoming and outgoing funds. "Buyers" are referred to as "borrowers" on this form even if no loan is involved.

The HUD-1 is also known as a "closing sheet" or "settlement form".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'HUD-1 Form'

The Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA) requires the HUD-1 form be used as the standard real estate settlement form in all transactions in the U.S. involving federally related mortgage loans. RESPA states borrowers should be given a copy of the HUD-1 at least one day prior to settlement, although entries may still be coming in a few hours before closing. Most buyers and sellers study the form on with their real-estate agent and the settlement agent. The more people who review it, the greater the likelihood of detecting any errors.

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