Hundredweight - Cwt

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DEFINITION of 'Hundredweight - Cwt'

A unit of measurement for weight used in certain commodities trading contracts. In North America, a hundredweight is equal to 100 pounds and is also known as a short hundredweight. In Britain, a hundredweight is 112 pounds and is also known as a long hundredweight.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Hundredweight - Cwt'

Hundredweight is used as a unit of measure in trading livestock, grains and other commodities contracts. For example, on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, the futures contract for rough rice is 2,000 hundredweights of long grain rough rice. In the past, hundredweight was used as a unit of measure for buying and selling many more commodities. Its usage has gradually declined, however, in favor of contract specifications in pounds or kilograms.

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