Hybrid Indicator

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DEFINITION of 'Hybrid Indicator '

A technical indicator that combines core elements of chart analysis with existing indicators. Hybrid indicators are one of the two main types of technical indicators, the other being unique indicators. The term may also refer to an indicator used to express the credit risk of hybrid securities.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Hybrid Indicator '

Indicators such as the Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD) and certain market breadth indicators are examples of hybrid indicators. Since these indicators combine existing indicators with chart patterns and mathematical manipulation, there are innumerable ways in which hybrid indicators can be formed.

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