Icahn Lift

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DEFINITION of 'Icahn Lift'

The name given to the rise in stock price that occurs when Carl Icahn begins to purchase shares in a company. The Icahn lift occurs because of Mr. Icahn's reputation for creating value for the shareholders of the companies in which he takes an interest.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Icahn Lift'

Carl Icahn is most famous for his work as an activist shareholder, but has also been referred to as a corporate raider. He purchases shares in a company that he believes is undervalued and then creates a plan to fix the problems. This usually involves spinning off profitable segments, changing management, cutting costs and buying back stock.

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