International Commodities Clearing House - ICCH

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DEFINITION of 'International Commodities Clearing House - ICCH'

An international clearing house for futures markets around the world. Based in London, the ICCH maintains and organizes the daily duties of clearing futures contracts and guarantees the due fulfillment of transactions for its registered members.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'International Commodities Clearing House - ICCH'

While the ICCH is a worldwide operator, it primarily serves as the common clearing house for the future markets in Great Britain and Europe. The ICCH is owned by six British clearing banks and provides clearing and settlement facilities for international future markets.

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