ICE LIBOR

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DEFINITION of 'ICE LIBOR'

See LIBOR

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'ICE LIBOR'

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Why is LIBOR sometimes referred to as LIBOR ICE?

    The ICE LIBOR (previously known as BBA LIBOR) is a standard rate using an average of the rate at which a contributing panel ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How is Libor determined?

    Libor is the major rate used to price debt stock. Libor is actually a set of several benchmarks that reflect the average ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between LIBOR, LIBID and LIMEAN?

    LIBOR, LIBID and LIMEAN are all reference rates used to benchmark short-term interest rates. The London Interbank Offered ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between LIBID and LIBOR?

    Both LIBID and LIBOR are rates primarily used by banks in the London interbank market. The London interbank market is a ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the similarities and differences between the savings and loan (S&L) crisis ...

    The savings and loan crisis and the subprime mortgage crisis both began with banks creating new profit centers following ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does the effective interest method treat the interest on a bond?

    The effective interest method is used when evaluating the interest generated by a bond because it considers the impact of ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    What Is ICE LIBOR And What Is It Used For?

    In the case of ICE LIBOR, an innocent-sounding set of letters has a profound bearing on every loan you make.
  2. Investing Basics

    The Insiders Who Fix Rates for Gold, Currencies And Libor

    The system by which benchmark rates are fixed for interest rates, currencies and gold is archaic - and, many would argue, deeply flawed.
  3. Economics

    London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR)

    Learn more about this rate which banks use to determine the amount of interest to charge other banks.
  4. Options & Futures

    An Introduction To LIBOR

    This influential rate is published daily in Britain, and felt all around the world.
  5. Entrepreneurship

    Fed Raising Rates Affects Startup Funding

    With interest rates having nowhere else to go but up, the Fed’s impending interest rate raise will likely begin to reverse the flow of startup funding.
  6. Professionals

    How Retirees Should Approach Interest Rate Hikes

    Here's what retirees can do if interest rates rise.
  7. Investing

    What’s Driving Markets Today

    While U.S. stocks managed to eke out modest gains last week, it wasn’t without some violent swings along the way.
  8. Investing

    Why Higher Rates Could Be Good News For Consumers

    While rates remain extraordinarily low by historical standards, in the last few months we have witnessed a modest change in the environment.
  9. Savings

    How Interest Rates Work on Savings Accounts

    Here's what you need to know to grow your rainy-day fund.
  10. Credit & Loans

    How Interest Rates Work On A Mortgage

    A step-by-step explanation of the interest calculations, mortgage types, and how the loan is eventually "retired" – which means paid off.

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