Individual Development Account - IDA

DEFINITION of 'Individual Development Account - IDA'

A savings account for lower income individuals. An IDA is used for a specific purpose such as education, purchasing a first home, or starting a business. Savings are matched by private or public funds.

BREAKING DOWN 'Individual Development Account - IDA'

The program provides economic literacy training that shows participants how to repair their credit, set up a budgeting and savings schedule, and teaches the basics of money management. IDAs help lower income individuals build assets and save for the future so they can break the cycle of poverty and achieve long-term self-sufficiency.

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