Inter-American Development Bank - IDB

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DEFINITION of 'Inter-American Development Bank - IDB'

A cooperative development bank founded in 1959 to accelerate the economic and social development of its Latin American and Caribbean member countries. The Inter-American Development Bank is owned by a total of 47 member countries including the United States and some European nations. The IDB assists Latin American and Caribbean countries in formulating development policies and provides financing and technical assistance to achieve environmentally sustainable economic growth, increase competitiveness, enhance social equity, fight poverty, modernize the state, and foster free trade and regional integration.

BREAKING DOWN 'Inter-American Development Bank - IDB'

The funds that the Inter-American Development Bank lends to its member countries are raised in the bond market. The bonds are backed by the loans the IDB makes, which carry the guarantee of capital pledged by the Bank's non-borrowing members. The bonds are triple-A rated and issued at market rates. The triple-A rating helps to keep borrowing costs for the member countries low.

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