International Foreign Exchange Master Agreement - IFEMA

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DEFINITION of 'International Foreign Exchange Master Agreement - IFEMA'

An agreement set forth by the Foreign Exchange Committee that reflects the best practices for transactions in the foreign exchange market. IFEMA was published in 1997 and sponsored by the British Bankers Association, Canadian Foreign Exchange Committee and the Tokyo Foreign Exchange Market Practices Committee.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'International Foreign Exchange Master Agreement - IFEMA'

IFEMA is a standardized agreement between two parties for the exchange of currency. The agreement covers all facets of the transaction, providing detailed practices on the creation and settlement for a forex contract. In addition to the terms of a contract, IFEMA explains the consequences of default, force majeure or other unforeseen circumstances.

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