Irrevocable Letter Of Credit - ILOC

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DEFINITION of 'Irrevocable Letter Of Credit - ILOC'

Correspondence issued by a bank guaranteeing payment for goods and services purchased by the one requesting the letter. An irrevocable letter of credit, or ILOC, cannot be canceled or modified in any way without explicit consent by the affected parties involved. For example, the issuing bank has no power to change the terms of an ILOC simply because the letter requester is having second thoughts. It should be noted, however, that ILOCs are in effect only for a specified time period and do, in fact, expire at a pre-determined point.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Irrevocable Letter Of Credit - ILOC'

Like many other forms of bank correspondence, irrevocable letters of credit are transferred and authenticated through SWIFT, as MT700s (message type 700). ILOCs give far more payment security to beneficiaries than revocable letters of credit and are particularly desirable for construction projects. This is because they are not subject to claims of preference in the result of a bankruptcy filing.

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