International Monetary Fund - IMF

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DEFINITION of 'International Monetary Fund - IMF'

An international organization created for the purpose of:

1. Promoting global monetary and exchange stability.

2. Facilitating the expansion and balanced growth of international trade.

3. Assisting in the establishment of a multilateral system of payments for current transactions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'International Monetary Fund - IMF'

The IMF plays three major roles in the global monetary system. The Fund surveys and monitors economic and financial developments, lends funds to countries with balance-of-payment difficulties, and provides technical assistance and training for countries requesting it.

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