Imperfect Market

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DEFINITION of 'Imperfect Market'

A market where information is not quickly disclosed to all participants in it and where the matching of buyers and sellers isn't immediate. Generally speaking, it is any market that does not adhere rigidly to perfect information flow and provide instantly available buyers and sellers.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Imperfect Market'

The perfect market, as defined in economic textbooks, is not a truly achievable goal, but is still a beneficial model that provides a starting point for observation of our present market status. Practically, the imperfect market is the only kind that really exists. Even in the United States, the most advanced financial market in the world, there are still numerous cases of price corruption, improperly disseminated information and other market inefficiencies.

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