Implicit Cost

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DEFINITION of 'Implicit Cost'

A cost that is represented by lost opportunity in the use of a company's own resources, excluding cash. The implicit cost for a firm can be thought of as the opportunity cost related to undertaking a certain project or decision, such as the loss of interest income on funds, or depreciation of machinery used for a capital project.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Implicit Cost'

Implicit costs can also be thought of as intangible costs that are not easily accounted for. For example, the time and effort that an owner puts into the maintenance of the company, rather than working on expansion, can be viewed as an implicit cost of running the business. In corporate finance decisions, implicit costs should always be considered when coming to a decision on how to allocate resources.

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