Implied Repo Rate

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Implied Repo Rate'

The rate of return that can be earned by simultaneously selling a bond futures or forward contract and then buying an actual bond of equal amount in the cash market using borrowed money. The bond is held until it is delivered into the futures or forward contract and the loan is repaid.

BREAKING DOWN 'Implied Repo Rate'

The implied repo rate comes from the reverse repo market, which has similar gain/loss variables as the implied repo rate. All types of futures and forward contracts have an implied repo rate, not just bond contracts.

For example, the price at which wheat can be simultaneous purchased in the cash market and sold in the futures market (minus storage, delivery and borrowing costs) is an implied repo rate. In the mortgage-backed securities TBA market, the implied repo rate is known as the dollar roll arbitrage.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Canadian Overnight Money Market ...

    A measure or estimate of the rate at which major dealers are ...
  2. Retail Repurchase Agreement

    An alternative to regular savings deposits. Under a retail repurchase ...
  3. Repurchase Agreement - Repo

    A form of short-term borrowing for dealers in government securities. ...
  4. Mortgage-Backed Security (MBS)

    A type of asset-backed security that is secured by a mortgage ...
  5. Reverse Repurchase Agreement

    The purchase of securities with the agreement to sell them at ...
  6. Dollar Roll

    A type of repurchase transaction in the mortgage pass-through ...
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Price Volatility Vs. Leverage

    Learn how to effectively gauge the risk of the markets you trade.
  2. Active Trading

    Commodities: The Portfolio Hedge

    These diverse asset classes can provide downside protection and upside potential. Find out how to use them.
  3. Options & Futures

    Money Management Matters In Futures Trading

    Learn how this overlooked area of trading can help improve your gains.
  4. Insurance

    Futures Fundamentals

    For those who are new to futures but want a solid understanding of them, this tutorial explains what futures contracts are, how they work and why investors use them.
  5. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Calculating Yield to Worst

    Yield to worst is the lowest possible yield on a bond that may be called in the future.
  6. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: United States Gasoline Fund

    Learn about the United States Gasoline Fund, the characteristics of the exchange-traded fund, and the suitability and recommendations of it.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: United States 12 Month Oil

    Find out more information about the United States 12 Month Oil ETF, and explore detailed analysis of the characteristics, suitability and recommendations of it.
  8. Investing Basics

    What is the Theory of Backwardation?

    Backwardation occurs when the futures price of a commodity is lower than its market price today.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: U.S 12 Month Natural Gas

    Learn about the United States 12 Month Natural Gas Fund, an exchange-traded fund that invests in 12-month futures contracts for natural gas.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares Floating Rate Bond

    Explore detailed analysis and information of the iShares Floating Rate Bond ETF, and learn how to use this ETF as a defense against rising interest rates.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the maximum Social Security disability benefits?

    The maximum Social Security disability benefit amount for a single eligible person in 2015 is $1,165 per month, but you can ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the relationship between the current yield and risk?

    The general relationship between current yield and risk is that they increase in correlation to one another. A higher current ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do futures contracts roll over?

    Traders roll over futures contracts to switch from the front month contract that is close to expiration to another contract ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Different types of companies may enter into futures contracts for different purposes. The most common reason is to hedge ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is a 'busted' convertible bond?

    In finance, a convertible bond represents a hybrid security that offers debt and equity features and risks. While a convertible ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Depreciation

    1. A method of allocating the cost of a tangible asset over its useful life. Businesses depreciate long-term assets for both ...
  2. Recession

    A significant decline in activity across the economy, lasting longer than a few months. It is visible in industrial production, ...
  3. Bubble Theory

    A school of thought that believes that the prices of assets can temporarily rise far above their true values and that these ...
  4. Stock Market Crash

    A rapid and often unanticipated drop in stock prices. A stock market crash can be the result of major catastrophic events, ...
  5. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  6. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!