Implied Rate

What is an 'Implied Rate'

An implied rate is an interest rate that is determined by the difference between the spot rate and the forward/futures rate. The degree of relative costliness of a future rate can be assessed by comparing the implied rate with the spot rate.

Calculated as:

Implied Rate

BREAKING DOWN 'Implied Rate'

For example, if the present spot rate of LIBOR is 5% and the forward rate for LIBOR is 6%, the implied rate is 1%. This situation merits the impression that the future rate for borrowing will be more expensive.

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RELATED FAQS
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  4. What are some securities that have spot rates?

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