Import And Export Prices

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Import And Export Prices'

Two indexes that monitor the prices of imports and exports in the United States. The import and export prices indexes are created by compiling the prices of goods purchased in the U.S. but produced out of country (imports) and the prices of goods purchased out of country but produced in the U.S. (exports).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Import And Export Prices'

The data from these indexes often has a direct impact on the bond markets. The indexes are used to help measure inflation in products that are traded globally. Bond prices will often decrease when importing inflation becomes to high, because it erodes the value of the original investment (principal).

Inflation can also hurt the equity markets, because as inflation increases, interest rates are often raised to help curtail the rising prices. Rising interest rates often mean falling stock prices.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Assembly Service

    Combining a number of small shipments from multiple parties into ...
  2. Terms of Trade - TOT

    The value of a country's exports relative to that of its imports. ...
  3. Index

    A statistical measure of change in an economy or a securities ...
  4. Economic Calendar

    A calendar used by traders for the purpose of tracking the occurrence ...
  5. Economic Cycle

    The natural fluctuation of the economy between periods of expansion ...
  6. Gross Domestic Product - GDP

    The monetary value of all the finished goods and services produced ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the primary factors that led to the difficult period of stagflation during ...

    Stagflation is a type of economic malaise in which a stagnant economy coincides with high inflation for a period of time. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is GDP and why is it so important to investors?

    The gross domestic product (GDP) is one the primary indicators used to gauge the health of a country's economy. It represents ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What data does the Bureau of Labor Statistics collect?

    According to its official website, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) collects "essential statistical data" about "labor ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What kinds of costs are included in Free on Board (FOB) shipping?

    Free on board (FOB) shipping is a trade term published by the International Chamber of Commerce or ICC, that indicates which ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What regulations exist to protect infant industries?

    There are far more protections of once-infant and now-dominant industries in the United States than regulations designed ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. In what manner will a recession likely affect the marginal-propensity-to-save rate ...

    The marginal propensity to save, or MPS, rises in most, though not all, recessions. This makes perfect sense on an individual ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Economic Indicators That Do-It-Yourself Investors Should Know

    Understanding these investing tools will put the market in your hands.
  2. Options & Futures

    Explaining The World Through Macroeconomic Analysis

    From unemployment and inflation to government policy, learn what macroeconomics measures and how it affects everyone.
  3. Forex Education

    Global Trade And The Currency Market

    Learn how the Bretton Woods system got the ball rolling for world trade.
  4. Active Trading

    Introduction To Stationary And Non-Stationary Processes

    What to know about stationary and non-stationary processes before you try to model or forecast.
  5. Retirement

    Economic Indicators To Know

    The economy has a large impact on the market. Learn how to interpret the most important reports.
  6. Economics

    What is a Resident Alien?

    A resident alien is a foreigner who is a permanent resident of the country in which he or she resides but does not have citizenship.
  7. Economics

    Explaining Protectionism

    Protectionism is government measures that limit imports into a country to protect commerce within that country against foreign competition.
  8. Economics

    What is Neoliberalism?

    Neoliberalism is a little-used term to describe an economy where the government has few, if any, controls on economic factors.
  9. Economics

    Understanding Natural Unemployment

    Natural unemployment is often defined as the lowest rate of unemployment an economy will reach.
  10. Economics

    Is Texas The Future Of America?

    The top three fastest-growing cities are located in Texas and 20% of jobs created between 2009 and 2014 were in the Lone Star State.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Social Security

    A United States federal program of social insurance and benefits developed in 1935. The Social Security program's benefits ...
  2. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  3. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  4. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  5. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  6. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!