Imputed Value

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DEFINITION of 'Imputed Value'

The value of an item for which actual values are not available. Imputed values are a logical or implicit value for an item, or time set, wherein a "true" value has yet to be ascertained. It would be a best guess estimate, in order to accurately estimate a larger set of values or series of data points.


Also known as "estimated imputation."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Imputed Value'

Imputed values can be used in a variety of situations, such as estimating opportunity cost of un-invested money, or estimating wages for obscure positions. Additionally, data points in time series data may require estimations, in order to complete a full range of figures. So long as the imputed values are fair estimates, there are typically no issues with their use.

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