In-House

AAA

DEFINITION of 'In-House'

Conducting an activity or operation within a company, instead of relying on outsourcing. A firm uses its own employees and time to keep a division or business activity, such as financing or brokering, in-house.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'In-House'

A firm may decided to in-house such activities as accounting, payroll or tech support. While it is common for some companies to outsource those divisions, a firm may maintain flexibility in those operations by keeping them in-house.

When dealing with customers, a firm may try to keep the entire transaction in-house. For example, in-house financing is a common practice in certain industries, using the firm's own resources to extend the customer's credit. For a brokerage, the firm may try to match a client's order with another customer, creating an in-house transaction. This allows the firm to benefit from both the buy- and sell-side commissions.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Inside Sales

    The sale of products or services by sales personnel who reach ...
  2. Outside Sales

    The sale of products or services by sales personnel who go out ...
  3. Knowledge Process Outsourcing - ...

    A form of outsourcing in which knowledge- and information-related ...
  4. Insourcing

    Assigning a project to a person or department within the company ...
  5. Commission

    A service charge assessed by a broker or investment advisor in ...
  6. Eat Your Own Dog Food

    A colloquialism that describes a company using its own products ...
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    Globalization: Progress Or Profiteering?

    Proponents of globalization argue that it helps the economies of developing nations and makes goods cheaper, while critics say that globalization reduces domestic jobs and exploits foreign workers. ...
  2. Personal Finance

    Mutual Funds: Brand Names Vs. House Brands

    Find out whether an in-house fund will serve you better than a major company's fund offerings.
  3. Economics

    What Are Economies Of Scale?

    Is bigger always better? Read up on the important and often misunderstood concept of economies of scale.
  4. Professionals

    Sales Director Career Provides Daily Challenge

    Find out what you need to do to close the deal on this investment management position.
  5. Professionals

    Understanding Interpersonal Skills

    Interpersonal skills are the social skills people use to interact effectively with other people. A lack of good interpersonal skills may lead to unsuccessful personal relationships, as well as ...
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    What's a Tangible Asset?

    Tangible assets are property owned by a business that can be touched -- they physically exist. Examples include furniture and fixtures, computer hardware, delivery equipment, leasehold improvements ...
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Cash Flow From Operating Activities

    Cash flow from operating activities is a section of the Statement of Cash Flows that is included in a company’s financial statements after the balance sheet and income statements.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    What are the components of shareholders' equity?

    Understanding company valuation figures, such as shareholders' equity, can be a powerful tool in assessing the financial strength of a business.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    What is the difference between the acid test ratio and working capital ratio?

    Using liquidity ratios to determine the financial stability of a company is an important tool to accounting professionals and investors.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    What are some examples of return on investment capital?

    Read about some basic examples of return on investment capital for publicly traded companies and companies that have a handful of investors.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  2. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
  3. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve to another depository institution ...
  4. Fixed Asset

    A long-term tangible piece of property that a firm owns and uses in the production of its income and is not expected to be ...
  5. Break-Even Analysis

    An analysis to determine the point at which revenue received equals the costs associated with receiving the revenue. Break-even ...
  6. Key Performance Indicators - KPI

    A set of quantifiable measures that a company or industry uses to gauge or compare performance in terms of meeting their ...
Trading Center