In Specie

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DEFINITION of 'In Specie'

A phrase describing the distribution of an asset in its present form, rather than selling it and distributing the cash. In specie distribution is made when cash is not readily available, or allocating the physical asset is the better alternative.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'In Specie'

An example of an in specie distribution is a stock dividend, which can be distributed to investors when cash is in short supply. It is common to see an in specie distribution made in the form of fractional shares such as 0.5 shares for each share held.

The phrase "in specie" is Latin for "in its actual form".

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