Inactive Bond Crowd

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DEFINITION of 'Inactive Bond Crowd'

A group of exchange members who buys and sells bonds, that are infrequently traded. Limit orders placed by the inactive bond crowd, may take a longer period of time to fill, due to the absence of frequent trading.


The opposite of inactive bond crowd is the active bond crowd.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Inactive Bond Crowd'

Before electronic trading, orders placed by those in the inactive bond crowd were stored in cabinets off to the side of the general trading floor. This gave rise to the nickname "cabinet crowd."

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