Inbound Cash Flow

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DEFINITION of 'Inbound Cash Flow'

Any currency that a company or individual receives through conducting a transaction with another party. Inbound cash flow can include sales revenue generated through business operations, refunds received from suppliers, financing transactions and amounts won through legal proceedings.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Inbound Cash Flow'

Any positive cash additions to an entity's bank account. When a salesperson is paid from their employer for their time spent working, this an inbound cash flow for the employee. Conversely, this payment to the employee represents an outbound cash flow for the employer. When the salesperson successfully completes a sale to a customers, this represents and inbound cash flow for the company.

As well, consider a company going through a round of debt financing. When a company issues bonds, they are borrowing money, which will need to be repaid in the future (with interest). However, at the time the bond is sold, the company receives the cash, which makes it an inbound cash flow for the company. When the bond is later repaid, this is an outbound cash flow for the company.

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