Incipient Default

DEFINITION of 'Incipient Default'

When a borrower appears to be heading toward defaulting on its debt. An incipient default is the foreshadowing of a person or company's inability to service a debt obligation.

BREAKING DOWN 'Incipient Default'

Within the loan arrangement, the lender can make specific provisions regarding an incipient default. Such provisions may place covenants on the borrower or impair a contractual right. Incipient defaults may be determined based on current business problems, such as an illiquid balance sheet or a low quick ratio.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What level of default rate is typical for the credit services industry?

    Learn how default rates affect businesses in the credit services industry, and what rates are considered normal for a company ... Read Answer >>
  2. What are the differences between delinquency and default?

    Find out more about loan delinquency, loan default, and the difference between a loan borrower defaulting and being delinquent ... Read Answer >>
  3. Why do companies issue debt and bonds? Can't they just borrow from the bank?

    Companies issue bonds to finance operations. Most companies can borrow from banks, but view direct borrowing from a bank ... Read Answer >>
  4. How do banks measure the Five Cs of Credit?

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