Income Property Mortgage

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DEFINITION of 'Income Property Mortgage'

A loan given to an investor to purchase a residential or commercial rental property. Income property mortgages are typically much harder to qualify for and often require a borrower to include estimates of the rental income that will be received from the property. Unlike owner-occupied and single-family residences, there are few government loan programs to assist in the purchase of income properties. This leaves investors at the mercy of private lenders, who themselves are at the mercy of the credit markets.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Income Property Mortgage'

Owning a rental property is one of the most common real estate goals of individual investors. Accomplishing this goal however, is much harder than the late-night infomercials would make it seem. The biggest hurdle in acquiring rental properties is securing an income property mortgage, which generally requires a larger down payment than the purchase of a primary residence. Typically, an income property mortgage requires a larger down payment relative to personal home mortgages.

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