What is an 'Income Bond'

An income bond is a type of debt security in which only the face value of the bond is promised to be paid to the investor, with any coupon payments being paid only if the issuing company has enough earnings to pay for the coupon payment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Income Bond'

The income bond is a somewhat rare financial instrument which generally serves a corporate purpose similar to that of preferred shares. It may be structured so that unpaid interest payments accumulate and become due upon maturity of the bond issue, but this is usually not the case; as such, it can be a useful tool to help a corporation avoid bankruptcy during times of poor financial health or ongoing reorganization.



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RELATED FAQS
  1. How does the money from the interest on my bond get to me?

    When you buy a regular coupon bond, you are entitled to a coupon, which is typically paid at regular intervals, and the face ... Read Answer >>
  2. How does a bond's coupon rate affect its price?

    Find out how a bond's coupon rate influences its price, including the role of government-dictated interest rates and the ... Read Answer >>
  3. How do debit spreads impact the trading of options?

    Find out what it means when a bond has a coupon rate of zero and how a bond's coupon rate and par value affect its selling ... Read Answer >>
  4. If I buy a $1,000 bond with a coupon of 10% and a maturity in 10 years, will I receive ...

    Simply put: yes, you will. The beauty of a fixed-income security is that the investor can expect to receive a certain amount ... Read Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between yield to maturity and the coupon rate?

    A bond's coupon rate is the actual amount of interest income earned on the bond each year based on its face value. The yield ... Read Answer >>
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