Incoterms

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DEFINITION of 'Incoterms'

Trade terms published by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) that are commonly used in both international and domestic trade contracts. Incoterms, short for "International Commercial Terms," are used to make international trade easier by helping traders in different countries understand one another. Incoterms were first developed in 1936 and are updated from time to time, in order to conform to current trade practices. Because of these updates, contracts should specify which version of Incoterms they are using (e.g., Incoterms 2010).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Incoterms'

Trade terms used in different countries may appear identical on the surface, but actually have different meanings as they are used domestically. Incoterms are internationally recognized and thus help to prevent confusion in terms of foreign trade contracts, by helping sellers and buyers understand their obligations in any transaction. Examples of Incoterms include "DAT" (Delivered at Terminal), "DDP" (Delivered Duty Paid) and "CIF" (Cost, Insurance and Freight).

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