Incoterms

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Incoterms'

Trade terms published by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) that are commonly used in both international and domestic trade contracts. Incoterms, short for "International Commercial Terms," are used to make international trade easier by helping traders in different countries understand one another. Incoterms were first developed in 1936 and are updated from time to time, in order to conform to current trade practices. Because of these updates, contracts should specify which version of Incoterms they are using (e.g., Incoterms 2010).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Incoterms'

Trade terms used in different countries may appear identical on the surface, but actually have different meanings as they are used domestically. Incoterms are internationally recognized and thus help to prevent confusion in terms of foreign trade contracts, by helping sellers and buyers understand their obligations in any transaction. Examples of Incoterms include "DAT" (Delivered at Terminal), "DDP" (Delivered Duty Paid) and "CIF" (Cost, Insurance and Freight).

RELATED TERMS
  1. Continuous Bond

    A financial guarantee commonly used in international trade that ...
  2. Free Alongside - FAS

    A trade term requiring the seller to deliver goods to a named ...
  3. Free Carrier - FCA

    A trade term requiring the seller to deliver goods to a named ...
  4. Free On Board - FOB

    A trade term requiring the seller to deliver goods on board a ...
  5. Ex Works - EXW

    A trade term requiring the seller to deliver goods at his or ...
  6. Currency Adjustment Factor - CAF

    A type of charge applied on top of freight costs by carriers ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What does 'Incoterms' mean in relation to Ex Works (EXW) trades?

    Ex works is part of the published Incoterms and outlines the obligations of transportation to buyers and sellers. The International ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the differences between Ex Works (EXW) and Free On Board (FOB)?

    Ex Works (EXW) and Free on Board (FOB) are Incoterms used to describe situations where sellers deliver goods. Ex Works describes ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Are there international maritime laws that govern delivery duty paid?

    Aspects of maritime law are relevant to international trade. However, delivery duty paid (DDP) only determines which party ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Is there a way to insure delivery duty paid?

    Delivery duty paid (DDP) cannot be insured, although insurance of goods during transport is one of the seller’s responsibilities ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Is there a way to profit from arbitrage trades on delivery duty paid?

    It is not possible to profit on Delivery Duty Paid (DDP) in arbitrage trades since DDP is not bought and sold; it is just ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Are the laws on delivery duty paid different in every country?

    Laws and regulations on delivery duty paid (DDP) vary between countries, but they are overall very similar. Regulations regarding ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    What Is International Trade?

    Everyone's talking about globalization, so we explain what is it and why some oppose it.
  2. Economics

    Globalization: Progress Or Profiteering?

    Proponents of globalization argue that it helps the economies of developing nations and makes goods cheaper, while critics say that globalization reduces domestic jobs and exploits foreign workers. ...
  3. Economics

    Do Cheap Imported Goods Cost Americans Jobs?

    Flooding the market with cheap products can mean job losses and even market collapse - but dumping isn't as threatening as it seems.
  4. Economics

    What Is The World Trade Organization?

    The WTO sets the global rules of trade. But what exactly does it do and why do so many oppose it?
  5. Economics

    China And The Maritime Silk Road

    We provide an overview of China's planned Maritime Silk Road.
  6. Forex Education

    What Is A Currency War & How Does It Work

    We look at what a currency war is, what factors may lead to it, the impacts of such a strategy, and whether there is a currency war currently.
  7. Economics

    What is a Capital Account?

    Capital account is an economic term that refers to the net change in investment and asset ownership for a nation.
  8. Economics

    Understanding the Fisher Effect

    The Fisher effect states that the real interest rate equals the nominal interest rate minus the expected inflation rate.
  9. Investing

    The Labor Market Recovery’s Missing Ingredient

    Job creation is running at the fastest pace since the 90s, and there is some evidence that wage growth is finally starting to accelerate, albeit modestly.
  10. Economics

    Gambling on Macau: Too Risky?

    Macau was once heralded as the new Las Vegas for casino investors. Is it too late?

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Adverse Selection

    1. The tendency of those in dangerous jobs or high risk lifestyles to get life insurance. 2. A situation where sellers have ...
  2. Wash Trading

    The process of buying shares of a company through one broker while selling shares through a different broker. Wash trading ...
  3. Fixed-Income Arbitrage

    An investment strategy that attempts to profit from arbitrage opportunities in interest rate securities. When using a fixed-income ...
  4. Venture-Capital-Backed IPO

    The selling to the public of shares in a company that has previously been funded primarily by private investors. The alternative ...
  5. Merger Arbitrage

    A hedge fund strategy in which the stocks of two merging companies are simultaneously bought and sold to create a riskless ...
  6. Market Failure

    An economic term that encompasses a situation where, in any given market, the quantity of a product demanded by consumers ...
Trading Center