Incremental Cost Of Capital


DEFINITION of 'Incremental Cost Of Capital'

A term used in capital budgeting, the incremental cost of capital refers to the average cost a company incurs to issue one additional unit of debt or equity. The incremental cost of capital varies according to how many more or fewer units of debt or equity a company wishes to issue. The calculation frequently used to determine the cost of capital is the weighted average cost of capital formula (WACC), which weights the cost of debt and equity, according to the company's capital structure.

BREAKING DOWN 'Incremental Cost Of Capital'

The term "incremental cost of capital" refers to costs associated with acquiring more debt or equity for a future project. The incremental cost of capital is usually equal to the hurdle rate, which is the required rate of return for the acceptance or rejecting of a project.

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