Incremental Cash Flow

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DEFINITION of 'Incremental Cash Flow'

The additional operating cash flow that an organization receives from taking on a new project. A positive incremental cash flow means that the company's cash flow will increase with the acceptance of the project.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Incremental Cash Flow'

There are several components that must be identified when looking at incremental cash flows: the initial outlay, cash flows from taking on the project, terminal cost or value and the scale and timing of the project. A positive incremental cash flow is a good indication that an organization should spend some time and money investing in the project.

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