Incumbency Certificate

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DEFINITION of 'Incumbency Certificate'

An official document that lists the names of incumbent directors and officers within an organization, and their corporate position within it. An Incumbency Certificate is used as confirmation of the identity of the signing authorities of a company and to prove that they are authorized to enter into legally-binding transactions on the company's behalf.


Also known as a Certificate of Incumbency.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Incumbency Certificate'

An Incumbency Certificate contains all relevant particulars such as the incumbent's name, position, whether elected or appointed, term of office and so on.


Incumbency Certificates are issued by the corporate secretary. Individuals who wish to confirm an officer's stated position within an organization may request an incumbency certificate from the secretary.

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