Index Investing

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Index Investing'

A form of passive investing that aims to generate the same rate of return as an underlying market index. Investors that use index investing seek to replicate the performance of a specific index – generally an equity or fixed-income index – by investing in an investment vehicle such as index funds or exchange-traded funds that closely track the performance of these indexes.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Index Investing'

Proponents of index investing eschew active investment management because they believe that it is impossible to "beat the market" once trading costs and taxes are taken into account. As index investing is relatively passive, index funds usually have lower management fees and expenses than actively managed funds. Lower trading activity may also result in more favorable taxation for index funds as compared with actively managed funds.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Exchange-Traded Fund (ETF)

    A security that tracks an index, a commodity or a basket of assets ...
  2. Indexing

    1. The adjustment of the weights of assets in an investment portfolio ...
  3. Closet Indexing

    A portfolio strategy used by some portfolio managers to achieve ...
  4. Index Fund

    A type of mutual fund with a portfolio constructed to match or ...
  5. Active Management

    The use of a human element, such as a single manager, co-managers ...
  6. Next Generation Fixed Income (NGFI) ...

    A Next Generation Fixed Income (NGFI) manager is a fixed income ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Does index trading increase market vulnerability?

    The rise of index trading may increase the overall vulnerability of the stock market due to increased correlations between ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between passive and active asset management?

    Asset management utilizes two main investment strategies that can be used to generate returns: active asset management and ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the formula for calculating the capital asset pricing model (CAPM) in Excel?

    The capital asset pricing model (CAPM) measures the amount of an asset's expected return given the risk-free rate, the beta ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the formula for calculating return on investment (ROI) in Excel?

    Return on investment (ROI) measures the performance of an investment by measuring the gain from an investment and the cost ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the most important equity market indexes?

    The most important equity market indexes are the S&P 500, Nasdaq Composite and Russell 2000. These indexes in total provide ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the 12b-1 fee meant to cover?

    A 12b-1 fee in a mutual fund is meant to cover the fees of companies and individuals through which investors of a fund buy ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETFs Vs. Index Funds: Quantifying The Differences

    If you are trying to choose between these two index-tracking investments, compare the costs.
  2. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The Hidden Differences Between Index Funds

    These funds don't all match index returns. Find out how to avoid costly surprises.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Enhanced Index Funds: Can They Deliver Low-Risk Returns?

    These funds may look appealing. Find out whether they can really live up to all of their promises.
  4. Options & Futures

    The Lowdown On Index Funds

    If you can't beat the market, why not join it? Read on to go over your options.
  5. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The Top 3 ETFs For Investing in the Russell 200 Index

    Learn about three ETFs that track the Russell Top 200 Index and how these ETFs have a very high correlation with the S&P 500 index.
  6. Investing Basics

    Got Dividends? Here's How to Reinvest Them

    Reinvesting dividends is almost always a good idea if you intend to hold your shares for the long term, and there are several ways to do it.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: SPDR S&P 500 Trust

    Find out more about the SPDR S&P 500 ETF Trust, the characteristics of the exchange traded fund and the suitability of investing in the fund.
  8. Professionals

    Target-Date vs. Index Funds: Is One Better?

    Target-date and index funds are difficult to compare because they differ in both structure and objective, though investors can compare two specific funds.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Why Mutual Funds are Still Better than ETFs

    Mutual funds might not be as sexy as they used to be, but they offer some advantages over ETFs – especially for certain types of investors.
  10. Professionals

    Why ETFs Often Edge Out Mutual Funds

    A deep look reveals why — in most instances — ETFs beat out mutual funds.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Dog And Pony Show

    A colloquial term that generally refers to a presentation or seminar to market new products or services to potential buyers.
  2. Topless Meeting

    A meeting in which participants are not allowed to use laptops. A topless meeting organizer can also ban the use of smartphones, ...
  3. Hedging Transaction

    A type of transaction that limits investment risk with the use of derivatives, such as options and futures contracts. Hedging ...
  4. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  5. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  6. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!