Industrial Organization


DEFINITION of 'Industrial Organization '

A field of economics dealing with the strategic behavior of firms, regulatory policy, antitrust policy and market competition. Industrial organization applies the economic theory regarding model of price to industries. Economists and other academics who study industrial organization seek to increase understanding of the methods by which industries operate, improve industries' contributions to economic welfare, and improve government policy in relation to these industries.

BREAKING DOWN 'Industrial Organization '

The study of industrial organization builds on the theory of the firm, a set of economic theories that describe, explain and attempt to predict the nature of a firm in terms of its existence, behavior, structure and its relationship to the market.

Several organizations exist to promote research and collaboration on the study of industrial organization. One such organization is the Industrial Organization Society (IOS), founded in 1972 by Stanley Boyle and Willard Mueller to promote research on antitrust policy, regulatory policy and competition and market power in real-world markets. The Review of Industrial Organization is the official journal of the IOS. The IOS has sponsored an annual International Industrial Organization Conference since 2003.

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