Inflation Accounting


DEFINITION of 'Inflation Accounting'

Special accounting techniques, which can be used during periods of high inflation. Inflation accounting requires statements to be adjusted according to price indexes, rather than rely solely on a cost accounting basis. Companies operating in countries experiencing hyperinflation, may be required to update their statements periodically, in order to make them relevant to current economic and financial conditions.

BREAKING DOWN 'Inflation Accounting'

Most developed countries have relatively stable rates of inflation. For countries with high rates of inflation, examining the books is difficult, because historical information is less likely to be relevant as prices increase rapidly.

  1. Cost Accounting

    A type of accounting process that aims to capture a company's ...
  2. Inflation

    The rate at which the general level of prices for goods and services ...
  3. Deflation

    A general decline in prices, often caused by a reduction in the ...
  4. Hyperinflation

    Extremely rapid or out of control inflation. There is no precise ...
  5. Inflation-Adjusted Return

    A measure of return that accounts for the return period's inflation ...
  6. Encumbrance

    A claim against a property by a party that is not the owner. ...
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