DEFINITION of 'Inflation-Linked Savings Bonds (I Bonds)'

U.S. government-issued debt securities similar to regular savings bonds, except they offer an investor inflationary protection, as their yields are tied to the inflation rate.

BREAKING DOWN 'Inflation-Linked Savings Bonds (I Bonds)'

Available directly from the U.S. Treasury, these debt securities are an exceptionally low-risk investment suitable for the most risk-averse investor; they have virtually zero default risk and inflationary risk.

While relatively risk-free assets such as these usually offer some of the lowest rates of return, it is important to note that I Bonds are usually exempt from income tax. They therefore provide a more attractive after-tax return.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What are "I Bonds" and how can I buy them?

    The term "I Bond" is industry lingo for inflation-linked savings bonds issued by the U.S. Treasury. You've probably heard ... Read Answer >>
  2. What forms of debt security are available for the average investor?

    Discover the various different types of debt securities, issued by government entities or corporations, that are available ... Read Answer >>
  3. How long will it take for a savings bond to reach its face value?

    Learn essential information about U.S. savings bonds along with an explanation of the unique characteristics of this popular ... Read Answer >>
  4. Why are treasury bond yields important to investors of other securities?

    Learn about the wide-ranging impact of U.S. Treasury Bond yields on all other interest-bearing instruments in the economy ... Read Answer >>
  5. What are some classes I can take to prepare for the Series 6 exam?

    Learn about how the risk-return tradeoff applies to bond yields, and the different types of risks associated with investing ... Read Answer >>
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