In-House Financing

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DEFINITION of 'In-House Financing'

A type of seller financing in which a firm extends customers a loan, allowing them to purchase its goods or services. In-house financing eliminates the firm's reliance on the financial sector for providing the customer with funds to complete a transaction.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'In-House Financing'

The automobile sales industry is a prominent user of in-house financing. Many vehicle sales rely on the buyer taking a loan, in-house financing allows the firm to complete more deals by accepting more customers. Whereas banks or other financial intermediaries might turn down a loan application, car dealerships can choose to lend to customers with poor credit ratings.

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